Home > Journals > SCIREA Journal of Education > Archive > Paper Information

Video Games as Narrative: Pedagogical Strategies for Using Games as Literature in the Composition Classroom

Volume 2, Issue 1, February 2017    |    PP. 18-30    |PDF (333 K)|    Pub. Date: March 1, 2017
   2429 Downloads     13755 Views  

Author(s)
Dr. John Misak, New York Institute of Technology

Abstract
Video games have developed into movie-like productions. This paper addresses how modern video games deliver a developed narrative and how such games can be used in the English Composition classroom, much like traditional texts, to help students learn writing craft. Through the exploration of pedagogical strategies for such use, this paper can inform English professors on how they might incorporate video games into their composition courses. The transformation of video games mimics that of movies decades ago; they can now be treated as a viable narrative medium. Games like Mass Effect, Bioshock Infinite and The Last of Us tell stories in varying degrees of linearity. Gamers experience this narrative and upon completion, they have experienced enough story to fill several books. Not only do students serve as an audience to narrative, in many games they serve as shapers of the story. The English composition instructor oftentimes struggles to unpack narrative for students, and can use the familiar video game to illustrate the storytelling process. By understanding of how video games form stories, students can learn to do so themselves. Just as the older video games helped develop creative imagination, newer games engage players in narrative that spans many topics, including social commentary, popular culture, and literature traditions. This paper focuses on games with strong narrative backgrounds and delves into the benefits and problems associated with using such games in the classroom.

Keywords
Video games, composition, narrative, technology and learning, literature, teaching, writing

Cite this paper
Dr. John Misak, Video Games as Narrative: Pedagogical Strategies for Using Games as Literature in the Composition Classroom, SCIREA Journal of Education. Vol. 2 , No. 1 , 2017 , pp. 18 - 30 .

References

[ 1 ] Biggs, T. (2014, June 22). Writing in Games: It's Much More than Narrative. Retrieved March 2, 2016, from IGN: http://www.ign.com/articles/2014/06/23/writing-in-games-itas-much-more-than-narrative
[ 2 ] Boltier, J. D. (2001). Writing Space: Computers, Hypertext, and the Remediation of Print. Mahwah, NJ: Routledge.
[ 3 ] Brooks, P. (1992). Reading for the Plot - Design and Intention in Narrative. Boston: Harvard University Press.
[ 4 ] College Students and Computer, Video and Internet Games. (2003, July 6). Retrieved from Pew Research Center: http://www.pewinternet.org/2003/07/06/college-students-and-computer-video-and-internet-games/
[ 5 ] Despain, W. (Ed.). (2008). Professional Techniques for Video Game Writing. Wellesley, MA: Ak Peters.
[ 6 ] Galarneau, L. (2014, January). 2014 Video Game Stats: Who Is Playing and Why? Retrieved from Big Fish Games: http://www.bigfishgames.com/blog/2014-global-gaming-stats-whos-playing-what-and-why/
[ 7 ] Gee, J. P. (2007). What Video Games Have to Teach Us About Learning and Literacy. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
[ 8 ] Juul, J. (1998). A Clash Between Game and Narrative. Digital Arts and Culture Conference. Bergen, Norway. Retrieved March 2, 2016, from http://www.jesperjuul.net/text/clash_between_game_and_narrative.html
[ 9 ] Wecker, M. (2012, April 9). College Students Find 'Serious' Video Games Educational, Fun. Retrieved March 2, 2016, from U.S. News and World Report: http://www.usnews.com/education/best-colleges/articles/2012/04/09/college-students-find-serious-video-games-educational-fun

Submit A Manuscript
Review Manuscripts
Join As An Editorial Member
Most Views
Article
by Sergey M. Afonin
3057 Downloads 61980 Views
Article
by Jian-Qiang Wang, Chen-Xi Wang, Jian-Guo Wang, HRSCNP Research Team
15 Downloads 51279 Views
Article
by Syed Adil Hussain, Taha Hasan Associate Professor
2418 Downloads 25002 Views
Article
by Omprakash Sikhwal, Yashwant Vyas
2486 Downloads 21039 Views
Article
by Munmun Nath, Bijan Nath, Santanu Roy
2364 Downloads 20643 Views
Upcoming Conferences