Abnormal Scapular Kinematics In Symptomatic Acromioclavicular Arthritis. A Biomechanical Analysis Using Inertial Sensors

Volume 9, Issue 1, February 2024     |     PP. 696-708      |     PDF (739 K)    |     Pub. Date: November 30, 2021
DOI: 10.54647/cm32691    60 Downloads     1236 Views  

Author(s)

Christos K. Yiannakopoulos, School of Physical Education & Sport Science, National & Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece
Iakovos Vlastos, School of Physical Education & Sport Science, National & Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece
Georgios Kallinterakis, School of Physical Education & Sport Science, National & Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece
Elina Gianzina, School of Physical Education & Sport Science, National & Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece
Nikolaos Sachinis, School of Physical Education & Sport Science, National & Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece

Abstract
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to non-invasively evaluate the scapula kinematics in a group of athletes with Acromioclavicular Joint (ACJ) arthritis using inertial sensors.
Methods: In this study 9 male overhead athletes with a mean age 33±5.9 years were enrolled with symptomatic ACJ osteoarthritis, secondary to Distal Clavicle Osteolysis. The dominant arm was affected in 7 cases. In all patients weight lifting was part of their daily exercise routine. Scapular kinematics was evaluated using an inertial measurement unit (IMU) consisting of a high-resolution accelerometer, gyroscope, and magnetometer. The IMUs were positioned in the upper and lower limbs, the scapula and sternum sensors. The patients were asked to perform shoulder abduction and forward flexion in the scapular axis and the displacement and rotational data of the movement were recorded using a dedicated software.
Results: Scapular motion was measurably affected in the symptomatic shoulder. The translation in abduction, measured in mm, was statistically significantly higher in the shoulder with ACJ osteoarthritis along the laterally directed x axis (23.54 ±7.1 mm vs 19.58 ±6.9 mm) and anteroposteriorly directed z axis (13.97 ± 2.97mm vs 7.17 ±4.73mm), The same finding was noticed in forward flexion for the z axis (14.03±2.53 mm vs 9.41±5.92 mm). The rotation, in rads, was significantly higher in the anteroposteriorly directed z axis (0.50±0.23 vs 0.37±0.052).
Conclusion: Scapular kinematics is affected in patients with symptomatic ACJ osteoarthritis as verified with the use of inertial sensors.

Keywords
Acromioclavicular Arthritis ;Distal Clavicle Osteolysis; Inertial Sensors; Scapular Kinematics; Shoulder

Cite this paper
Christos K. Yiannakopoulos, Iakovos Vlastos, Georgios Kallinterakis, Elina Gianzina, Nikolaos Sachinis, Abnormal Scapular Kinematics In Symptomatic Acromioclavicular Arthritis. A Biomechanical Analysis Using Inertial Sensors , SCIREA Journal of Clinical Medicine. Volume 9, Issue 1, February 2024 | PP. 696-708. 10.54647/cm32691

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