The effect of early sedation depth on clinical outcomes in mechanically ventilated patients with sepsis

Volume 9, Issue 1, February 2024     |     PP. 189-197      |     PDF (206 K)    |     Pub. Date: May 31, 2021
DOI: 10.54647/cm32500    79 Downloads     1093 Views  

Author(s)

Zhou-feng Wang, Department of Respiratory and Critical Care, Ningbo First Hospital Longshan Hospital Medical and Health Group, Ningbo, Zhejiang Province, P. R. China
Heng Fan, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Ningbo First Hospital, Ningbo, Zhejiang Province, P. R. China

Abstract
Objective: To investigate the relationship between early sedation depth and clinical outcomes in mechanically ventilated patients with sepsis.
Methods: A prospective cohort study was conducted in an adult intensive care unit (ICU), and detailed clinical data of septic patients were collected. Multivariable analysis was used to calculate the relationship between early sedation depth and clinical outcomes, and all patients were followed up to 28 days in ICU or discharged from the hospital.
Results: A total of 100 septic patients were obtained, and 656 ICU days were followed, and 2312 Richmond Agitation and Sedation Scale assessments were undergone. Multivariable analysis indicated that septic patients with early deep sedation had more APACHEⅡ scores (MD: 2.78, 95%CI: 1.18-3.97, P=0.002), delirium-free days (MD: 1.12, 95%CI: 0.41-2.01, P=0.016), ICU length of stay (MD: 3.31, 95%CI: 1.76-4.54, P=0.011) and ventilator-free days (MD: 2.57, 95%CI: 1.12-3.97, P=0.003) than those patients with early light sedation. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that early deep sedation was independently associated with 28-day mortality (log-rank P=0.001).
Conclusion: Early light sedation may improve the clinical outcomes in mechanically ventilated patients with sepsis.

Keywords
Sedation, Sepsis, Mechanical ventilation, Mortality

Cite this paper
Zhou-feng Wang, Heng Fan, The effect of early sedation depth on clinical outcomes in mechanically ventilated patients with sepsis , SCIREA Journal of Clinical Medicine. Volume 9, Issue 1, February 2024 | PP. 189-197. 10.54647/cm32500

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