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Anthropocentric Naturism in The Broken Earth by Nora K. Jemisin

Volume 7, Issue 1, February 2023    |    PP. 38-58    |PDF (293 K)|    Pub. Date: January 15, 2023
DOI: 10.54647/sociology840975    8 Downloads     118 Views  

Author(s)
Shohreh Haji Mola Hosein, PhD of English Literature, Department of English Language & Literature, Kish International Campus, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran

Abstract
Anthropocentric naturism, mingling with sexism, dualism, colonialism, and other oppressive structures, is one of the obvious themes in the multigenre trilogy of The Broken Earth, written by American author, Nora k. Jemisin. Anthropocentric naturism is the instrumentalization of the earth, natural resources, and other species for anthropocentrist humans’ beneficial targets. The speculative science fantasy trilogy exposes the history of humans’ abuse of natural resources and the humans’ demise through natural calamities. Drawing on the studies of eco-social feminist theorizers, known as Val Plumwood, Greta Gaard, Susan Dubscha, and Juliet Ozanne, this article discloses the causes of eco-mishaps in the trilogy which reflects the real world and its non-stop eco-catastrophe. It foregrounds activation, logic, individuality, and integration of the earth with self-ecologist champions to support eco-human solidarity and cooperation of species and the more than-human-world for the renovation of the world.

Keywords
Anthropocentric Naturism, Abuse of Natural Resources, Colonialism, Dualism, Eco-social Feminist, Eco-human Solidarity

Cite this paper
Shohreh Haji Mola Hosein, Anthropocentric Naturism in The Broken Earth by Nora K. Jemisin, SCIREA Journal of Sociology. Vol. 7 , No. 1 , 2023 , pp. 38 - 58 . https://doi.org/10.54647/sociology840975

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