Volume 7, Number 3 (2022)
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Home > Journals > SCIREA Journal of Computer > Archive > Paper Information

Logbook to login

Volume 7, Issue 3, June 2022    |    PP. 46-50    |PDF (270 K)|    Pub. Date: July 31, 2022
DOI: 10.54647/computer52301    12 Downloads     111 Views  

Author(s)
Dulli Chandra Agrawal, Professor of Physics (Emeritus), Banaras Hindu University (India)
Albert Manfredi, Principal Engineer at Boeing Defense Systems, The Boeing Company (United States)

Abstract
The concept of logbook started with a view to keep day-to-day navigation based records of a ship, for a better management of its operation. The duty watch signs into the logbook at the beginning of his shift, then signs off at the end, passing the watch duty to the next watch stander. This maintains a clear record of the ship evolutions in that time period, and the identity of the personnel on duty at the time.
Later on the concept was extended to a wide variety of other practices for the utilization and management of expensive and complex machines, vehicles, agricultural fields and so on.
In the modern era our personal computers do not need such a manual logbook, because they keep records of each and every operation performed. However, the terms login or logon, and logoff, derive from these precedents.

Keywords
History, logbook, login, logon, logoff

Cite this paper
Dulli Chandra Agrawal, Albert Manfredi, Logbook to login, SCIREA Journal of Computer. Vol. 7 , No. 3 , 2022 , pp. 46 - 50 . https://doi.org/10.54647/computer52301

References

[ 1 ] Waters, David W. (1985). "English Navigational Books, Charts and Globes Printed Down to 1600". Google books. Instituto de Investigação Científica Tropical. Retrieved May 21, 2021.
[ 2 ] Log | nautical instrument | Britannica
[ 3 ] Schlueter, Roger (2016), “To understand knots, get a really long rope and a boat” https://www.bnd.com/living/liv-columns-blogs/answer-man/article116957033.html
[ 4 ] Today, the term “Knot” refers to one nautical mile per hour. And one nautical mile, by convention, refers to the distance between one minute of arc of latitude, and longitude at the equator, which has been standardized internationally to 1852.00 meters.
[ 5 ] https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/deployment/upgrade/log-files

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