Reflection of Martial Arts in the Iranian Performing Arts

Volume 8, Issue 2, April 2024     |     PP. 90-115      |     PDF (422 K)    |     Pub. Date: March 5, 2024
DOI: 10.54647/sociology841266    25 Downloads     67359 Views  

Author(s)

Mohsen Zahabi, Master of Art, Department of Directing and Acting, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, Iran

Abstract
This study aims to examine the influence of martial arts on performing arts in Iran. The impact of various performing arts and martial arts on each other has been the subject of study by several researchers. Despite Iran being an ancient and vast country with a variety of cultures, religions, and ethnicities, there has yet to be any research into the influence of martial arts on performing arts in Iran. This study aims to fill this gap by analyzing the performing aspects of martial arts, which can be considered a performing art, before analyzing the effects of martial arts on the performing arts of Iran. These elements are pattern practice [kata], acrobatics, and other spectacular performing elements that are remarkable in martial arts combat and training. Additionally, we analyzed the history of those Iranian performing arts that were evidently influenced by martial arts, such as martial dances, Iranian traditional wrestling, and other ancient Iranian performances, such as Magophonia and Zurkhaneh. The study was conducted using library and internet sources and a descriptive-analytical approach.

Keywords
Performing Arts; Martial Arts; Wrestling; Martial Dance; Ritual.

Cite this paper
Mohsen Zahabi, Reflection of Martial Arts in the Iranian Performing Arts , SCIREA Journal of Sociology. Volume 8, Issue 2, April 2024 | PP. 90-115. 10.54647/sociology841266

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